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. >> ban ki moon has arrived in cairo in support of the cease- fire between israel and hamas. >> the exiled leader of hamas says they must take the first up a bit want the truce in israel. they will consider a cease-fire in israel and their attacks and the siege of gaza. >> israel has bombed building and at least 90 people have been killed and some 700 wounded since the air strikes began. >> the bombardment of gaza continues. israeli defense forces are picking targets they say it are connected to palestinian militants. the billionaire also among the latest casualties. across the border in israel, ground troops are massing in preparations for a possible invasion. israel has no mobilize and 40,000 reservists. elsewhere, diplomats are attempting to broker a ceasefire. in jerusalem, middle east peace envoy tony blair met with perez to stop the rocket attacks. >> it is clear we do not have any ambition to gain an advantage but we just want to stop the fire. >> more than 1000 rockets have been fired from a hamas- controlled gaza into israel. the defense system has stopped most of the rockets and
the country, one of his follows had just been picked up at the cairo airport and the police had him. and the man, this powerful religious leader is crying- no power again, you know, to go back to it. so let's hear a couple of words from reverend noor, a protestant christian in cairo, egypt. >> egypt is obviously a predominantly muslim country, but within egypt is a smaller christian minority in the coptic church, but even a smaller minority in the protestant evangelical church of reverend menes abdul noor. reverend noor is a world-famous spokesperson for protestant christianity, and he heads the kasr el-doubara evangelical church. >> you know, to be a christian and a minority group, this is something americans cannot understand. but to be always a second-class citizen, always to lose your job because you are a christian, always you are not promoted simply because you are a christian- your faith costs you something- so you cling to christ. so the catholics of egypt and orthodox of egypt as well as the protestants of egypt being under pressure all the time, discriminated against becau
of them palestinians. palestinian militants have continued firing weapons into israel. in cairo, discussions are ongoing about cease-fire. jeremy our coverage from gaza. >> good morning, gaza. this was the wake-up call sent in by israel. growing up in gaza is not easy. not far away, is the rubble left by the israeli strike on sunday that killed 10 members of this family including four children and two neighbors. they are looking for the remains of a teenage girl missing and presumed dead. this man is a relative of the dead. >> sad, may be strong. >> street are getting tougher, more solid. when they tell the parents of a boy, he will grow up for revenge. >> during the last of years, the conflict has been overshadowed by dramatic changes elsewhere in the middle east. the differences between the two sides got sharper. what makes this crisis difficult and dangerous is it is happening in a region more unstable than at any time since the 1950's. hamas released videos of rocket launches. the events of the last few weeks have silenced those who said they had forgotten how to fight israe
into effect just moments ago. >> that's right. the deal was announced in cairo by the egyptian foreign minister and the u.s. secretary of state. the truce calls for an immediate halt to the fighting and reportedly aims to work towards a longer-term solution as well. >> the latest escalation in violence began just over a week ago. since then, some 140 palestinians and five israelis have been killed in air strikes and rocket attacks. >> we will be trying to go live to cairo and also to gauze in a moment, but first, let's get back to evens earlier in it -- earlier in the day that threatens to derail the talks -- we will be trying to go live to cairo and also to gaza in a moment. >> panic on the streets of televisa. ambulances rushed to the scene of the explosion. -- panic on the streets of tel aviv. the bus was burned out but not torn apart, suggesting it may have been a relatively small bomb. israel is calling this a terrorist attack. >> hamas is a murderous organization, an organization that calls for israel's destruction. anyone who negotiates with them and the prime minister's holding
are organizing their run protests. turbulence on the cairo stock exchange in the wake of sunday's major sell-off. traders and market analysts fear a lengthy political crisis. he has since tried to assure his seizure of powers will be temporary. he's has confidence in the search for a compromise. they're asking him to use restraint. >> democracy means the rule of law and the division of powers. therefore, i appeal to the egyptian leadership to seek a compromise. >> that is what the demonstrators in cairo are looking for. they vow to continue until he meets their demands. >> for the latest on the story, we are joined now from cairo, and he is following the events there. the president is trying to diffuse the situation and he is negotiating with senior judges. is there any sign of a compromise? >> not yet. the country is really waiting to see if he is going to give in and see if there will be a compromise. the only thing he underlined yesterday is the measure of glory. by substance, no compromise yet. >> what about the mood on the street compared with what you have experienced over the last 18
is growing tonight. more than 200,000 protesters have filled cairo's tahrir square. they are angry with their new president, mohamed morsi who said last week that his decisions cannot be challenged by the courts which gives him almost absolute power. and our holly williams is above tahrir square in cairo this evening. holly, what's going on in the crowd behind you now? >> reporter: scott, we are seeing scenes reminisce september of the egyptian revolution. tahrir square was once again carpeted in people today, tens of thousands of people who poured in from every direction and they were chanting the same slogan that they chanted during the revolution. the people want the downfall of the regime. i was out on this square earlier today talking to people. some people are saying that they won't leave the streets until president morsi rescinds the decrees that have given him sweeping new powers. we've seen very low-level violence here in cairo, but in several other cities there have been violent confrontations between president morsi's supporters and his opponents. >> pelley: is there any
you some pictures out of cairo, egypt. you may have seen there was a power grab a bite that guy, a head of the muslim brotherhood the egypt. he just recently declared himself the ayatollah of egypt and a lot of egyptian and not happy about that. this guy essentially put himself and his government above the judiciary. when you don't have a free judiciary you have a dictatorship. a lot of people said that is where the muslim brotherhood wanted to go and a lot of people in egypt particularly protesters to the right of your screen think that is where egypt is going. we will follow the story all day. let's check shares of apple as the market opens. apple shares are down. no, they're up $4. apple has been trading down, the low it has been about 530. of high was 700, when it then dropped 20% so apple is trading up $5, that is a nice little hop of 1% and it looks like it is continuing to rise, seeing real competition from a lot of other imitations. some would say straight competition for the iphone. also those tablets have really given a hit to apple over the past couple months. we don'
. their existence. >> we will be going live to cairo later in the show to check out the egyptian reaction to the crisis ongoing at the moment. meanwhile, angela merkel has been on a visit to moscow where she has been outspoken about human rights in russia. "she has been traveling with a business contingent of her trip has not just been about the euro. the ruble. >> they passed a resolution that underscored fears about the kremlin's commitment. >> vladimir putin as an less than happy to hear the criticism. clutched kendel merkel was expecting a chilly reception and. >> at a joint conference with business leaders, questions from the audience quickly turned to what many here see as an increasingly critical tone that germany and europe are taking with russia. >> she was surprisingly candid in her assessment. >> she said, we are concerned and it is my view as well that the kremlin has adopted a series of laws that do not do anything to promote principles such as the right of political groups to organize freely. she highlighted the two-year prison sentence given to members of the rock band puss
we've got reports tonight from israel and cairo. and christiane amanpour has an exclusive interview with a defiant hamas leader. >> is it useful to kill civilians? is that useful to you? >>> and women of a certain age, seeking much younger men. extreme cougar wives looking for love and more, if they can find the right cub. >>> plus, fryer beware. there's a wrong way to do it. a very wrong way. so, tonight, my co-anchor bill weir with a "nightline" holiday tradition. his sorta safe step-by-step guide to deep frying your thanksgiving turkey. >> it's foolproof. gobble gobble, everybody. >> announcer: from the global resources of abc news, with terry moran, cynthia mcfadden and bill weir in new york city, this is "nightline," november 21st, 2012. >> good evening, i'm terry moran. well, tonight, the guns of gaza and israel have gone silent, for now. a hard won and desperately fragile cease-fire is in place, on paper, between israel and palestinians have been schilling each other for days and threatening a wider, bloodier war. in gaza tonight, celebrations as israel agreed to end air stri
in cairo explode again while the region watches a shaky cease-fire. >>> and the stories we're just now learning about. the people who saved so many lives after that awful chain-reaction thanksgiving day pileup in texas. >> and thinking outside the box when shopping for that perfect gift. remember, a lot of kids are just fine with the box. nightly news begins now. >>> good evening, we learned a new term this year, you might have heard it, some people were trotting out gray thursday to describe the stores open on thanksgiving day to get a jump on the shopping season that normally begins with black friday today, tonight. and all over the country. while the gray was meant to show the kind oretailing gray area, the black in black friday of course, means in the black positive sales to start off the season. there was a time when this day every year was not the same as injuries, incidents and riots, but it has happened again as americans get all worked up into a shopping frenzy. we begin tonight with courtney reagan at the mall in fairfield in dayton, ohio, good evening. >> reporter: good even
of cairo as the power struggle es is a rates in egypt, holly williams is there with the latest. >> you are still the prettiest girl at the ball. >> the actor larry hagman, j.r. ewing from the tv series dallas has died at the age of 81, manuel bojorquez looks back on his long career, and signs of the times, lucy kraft shows us the high tech advertisements that are becoming an inescapable site in modern day japan. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news." >> good evening, the i am chip reid, one day after the holiday season kickoff the nation's merchants have reason for joy, by one estimate the number of black friday shoppers was up 20 percent over the same day last year. the question now is whether shoppers can maintain the pace. terrell brown is watching the shoppers and their treasures in new york tonight. >> it is shaping up to be a record-setting opening to this holiday shopping season. one retailer at wal-mart the neigh nation's biggest said it sold nearly 5,000 items a second on thanksgiving night, as stores opened their doors this year earlier than ever.
from nbc's ayman mohyeldin in cairo. >> reporter: a day of mourning across egypt, in cairo, thousands paid respects to a protester killed by police. and in alexandria, a funeral for the member of the muslim brotherhood, just fifteen years old. both were victims of the riots that broke out after president morsy gave himself sweeping new powers. it ignited a wave of protests among them, and loyal supporters fighting in the streets. the muslim brotherhood were to blame, we elected them, thought they would lift us up, but they threw us to the ground. i will never vote for them again in my life, this woman says, many believe that morsy over-reached, and he moved quickly to oversee the damage, meeting tonight with egypt's judicial council, claiming tonight he would limit the scope of his powers. morsy supporters say he had to act to reign in egypt's powerful judges. >> every time we approached the shore of the transition, somebody would sink the boat. that somebody, thus far has been the court of egypt, and hosni mubarak led and politically managed courts. >> reporter: egypt's judges have b
to egypt. >> there have been more clashes in the egyptian capital, cairo, against what is viewed as a power grab by president morsi. >> thousands of people have converged on tahrir square today as part of a nationwide protest called by opponents of the president's. >> the spirit of the arab spring has returned to cairo. tens of thousands of egyptians have once again taken to tahrir square of the president's decree giving him sweeping new powers. he has been decried as a power- hungry activists and executioner of the egyptian revolution. >> the supreme leader of the muslim brotherhood is the true leader of egypt. >> this was the biggest protest organized by opponents of the muslim brotherhood since morsi took office. the muslim brotherhood cancel the protest in support of the president to stave off further clashes, but the debate between a secular and islamic egypt continues. >> the muslim brothers want islam as a country. that is their agenda. they are not hiding it. it is not as though they are doing it suddenly or secretly. this is their declared agenda. >> tensions are running high, and
for americans inside he egypt and our embassy in cairo vazing them to avoid large clouds there and the embassy reporting protesters are pelting nearby police guarding with molotov cocktails and all of this is a backlash against morsi escalating reports tonight of one person killed and another injured on attacks on muslim brotherhood north of cairo and the muslim brotherhood morsi's political party and angered many opposition activist was a power grab, and giving himself near absolute control of egypt. steve harrigan is streaming live for us from cairo. he understands you're in tahrir square? >> reporter: harris, that square behind me, as you can see from our live pictures, more tents have sprung up as the evening has gone on and those protesters say they are there to say we're hearing some small explosions and tear gas after three nights of protests here, skirmishes, and at least 500 people injured in those protests and now a death tonight as well. this coming north of cairo when an office of the muslim brotherhood, the group that supports the president was attacked, one 15-year-old boy killed
's apparently wrapped up talk in cairo with president morsi, who this time yesterday was saying a truce, at least a cease-fire of some sorts, was just hours, hours away. let's go to tel aviv. sara sidner is standing by. tell our viewers what happened just a few hours ago. >> reporter: around noon, tel aviv time, there was an explosion on the number 61 bus. it was very close to the military headquarters here, very close to the courts here, along a street that was eventually block off by police. at least 22 people were injured, some of those people were on the bus, some outside the bus. they suffered everything from panic attacks to a couple teenagers who have the worst of the injuries. we talked to the e.r. doctor who told us one of the teenagers may lose a limb, perhaps an arm because of the soft tissue that's been blasted away. also a lot of shrapnel wounds in the face. both may face a lifetime of disability. those are his words. we talked to the police, more still looking for a suspect, trying to find out who was responsible. we saw the bus before testify driven away. all the windows
of cairo. today's protest are not that high emotions remain raw in prepation of morsi. top judges are calling itun precedent they are calling morsi the modern day favor and fearing that he would be a dictator. i am uma live in washington. america's news head quarters starts right now. in response to the opposition in the streets was cairo. the muslim brotherhood is calling for a protest in cairo. they are joining with the latest on the developing story. steve. uma right now we are looking at what could be a show down between morsi and the country's judges here in cairo and others in the country. they say they will sphop work until the new president repeals his thursday decree that gave him the power to issue laws without oversight ask chance of them being over turned by the courts. the judges say he's trying to put himself above the law. it will be interesting to see whether all legal prosecutions come to a halt. numbers are fall down today. and numbers large yesterday about 40,000 at their peek and the protest turned violent. one police car set on fire. and protestors are hurling
to a cease-fire. a deal was announced in cairo by secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister. israel agreed to stop air strikes in gaza, where at least 161 palestinians have been killed since last wednesday. hamas promised to stop firing rockets which have killed five israelis. there were fears the deal might not happen after a bomb went off on a bus in tel aviv this morning. 27 people were hurt, no one has claimed responsibility. we have reports from gaza and israel tonight. we begin with clarissa ward in cairo, where that cease-fire was brokered. >> reporter: after 24 hours of intense shuttle diplomacy, secretary clinton walked away with what she came for: a cease- fire agreement between israel and hamas that she called the first step in a long process. >> the people of this region deserve the chance to live free today's agreement is a step in the right direction that we should build on. now we have to focus on reaching a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security, dignity and legitimate aspirations of palestinians and israelis alike
in afghanistan under investigation after new revelations in the cia sex scandal. >> in cairo, eu foreign ministers and members of the arab league discuss the syrian crisis. the lenders in charge of patching up the eurozone have gone head to head in a very public disagreement on the best way to deal with grease. >> at a meeting in brussels, the head of the imf and -- the heads of the imf and eurozone clashed over when greece should reduce its debt. >> but they did at least agree on a few things -- above all the grece could have at least two years to cut deficit. >> it is a question of how much progress greece can realistically be expected to make in a particular amount of time. >> greece's international lenders were playing down their differences the morning after the clash over athens' debts. the imf wants greece to achieve its lower ratio by 2020 while the eu foreign ministers want to allow the country two more years. >> there's no disagreement between the imf and the euro group, but the way forward is difficult. even if we agree on a target date, we have to figure out how to get there.
the egyptian president, along with representatives from qatar and turkey, held talks in cairo with hamas' leader in exile. the israelis call him a terrorist, but so far, they haven't object the to the egyptians' efforts. margaret. >> brennan: allen pizzey in tel aviv. thank you. for more on the gaza conflict we're joined in washington by our senior national security analyst, juan zarate. juan, good evening. >> good evening, margaret. >> brennan: what exactly is egypt trying to accomplish? >> well, egypt is trying to broker a cease-fire here. they want the violence to stop. they also want to demonstrate that they can serve as a regional power, they can bring peace, and for the sake of president morsi and the muslem brotherhood running egypt they want to consolidate power and get the economy running. they don't want a war to be starting on their doorstep at a time when they are not in full control in cairo. >> reporter: egypt and israel are the top recipients of u.s. foreign aid. what kind of leverage does the u.s. have? >> president obama has pledged $1 billion in aid to the egyptian gove
of cairo and now there are fears a second revolution may be looming in egypt goi following the series of decrees. the decree that gives the president immunity from the nation's courts. nbc reports from cairo. >> reporter: for a fourth straight night, protesters attacked the office of morsi's freedom party. demonstrators are angry at morsi's decision that is leaning the country to a dictatorship. >> a country of institution. not symbolize in one person. >> reporter: morsi's decree gives him more powers. morsi's decisions are beyond challenges and he also dismissed the attorney general. now the attorney general backed by the country's powerful judges, many of whom were appointed by hosni mubarak are fighting back. they are calling for a strike? the courtrooms. morsi and others have blamed the judiciary for blocking key reforms and annuling the party. mainly islam report. on tuesday, tens of thousands of supporters of the president are expected to hold competing rallies a few miles apart from each other. without a solution, the streets of egypt may not be calm. reporting for nbc, cairo.
&t. ♪ >>> a massive anti-government protest is under way in cairo today. opponents of egypt's newly elected president is going to pull back of his decrees issued last friday. nbc's ayman mulhedian has the report. >> reporter: tens of thousands of egyptians are expected to pour into the tahrir square on thursday demanding president morsi rescind a decree that gave him sweeping new powers, particularly the ability to legislate without any judicial review. outside the u.s. embassy, r rioters clashed. now president morsi has defended his decision saying he had to take the measure because of judicial interference. he said the egypt judicial is full of remnants of the old regime and not allowing him to get anything done in the country. organizations have been concerned that morsi and his muslim brotherhood are trying to usurp power in the country. it has left hundreds of people injured and a few deaths. officials in cairo are concerned about growing confrontations. arriva reporting for nbc news, cairo. >>> meantime in the west bank, scientists are studying the remains of yasser arafat. looking for more clu
indeed. kevin connolly in cairo. the spokes person for the israeli defense force joins us live from tel aviv. thanks for being with us. what's your reaction to the fact more rockets appeared to have been fired at tel aviv? it shows the palestinian militants in gaza have longer- range rockets. >> of far, they have not managed to really target tel aviv according to my initial investigation. rockets did not hit the ground in tel aviv as of yet. we were aware they have these capabilities. this is why we targeted their the groundd -- on th fire fight. they have a rocket destined to read tel aviv. >> how long will the military offensive in gaza continue? reservists have been drafted in. is that the precursor to a ground operation? >> the operation will continue as long as we reach our goal. the main goal of the operation is to defend nearly 3 million israelis currently under this immediate rocket danger from gaza launched by hamas and other terrorist organizations. this is what all options are still on the table, including a ground operation. we are currently assessing our next steps and wil
'll debate it. and the protests in cairo, the white house refuses to condemn the egyptian president's dictator-like grab. all of that, and a "hannity" shootout with juan williams and more. "hannity" starts right now. tonight as the fiscal cliff drama unfolds on capitol hill, we'll take a step back and look at how we got to this point. namely, how do we become a nation buried under more than $16 trillion debt, why crippling defense cuts, and the largest tax increase will take hold in 35 days because your elected officials don't know how to stop spending money. let me first play a small part of one of the most memorable inaugural addresses of all time. >> my fellow americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country. >> sean: sadly five decades removed from that iconic speech, the democratic party, its leaders, and countless other americans, rely on government for too many things. instead of asking what they can do for their country, they're asking what their country can do for them. now the debt record is at record levels, tax rates are soaring,
happened about 70 miles outside of cairo. one of the regional offices. one person killed in the attack, 60 wounded. here in cairo security forces skirmishes continues you can hear sirens and ambulances as well as tear gas is popped off as several thousand protestors are demonstrating to show their unhappiness. >> gregg: will morsi plan on meeting the judges tomorrow and what will they be talking about? >> as you know the judges across the country have threatened to go out on strike over this power grab by the egyptian president. there has been a meeting scheduled for tomorrow between morrisi and the judges no word of a cancellation. it could be an attempt by the egyptian president to reach out to opponents trying to draw black from the violence that has escalated. what we are waiting for as far as the demonstrations, when pro and anti-people on the ground will try and march. we'll get a gauge of their numbers to see how strong they are. right now opposition figures say they will be no dialogue with the egyptian president until he revokes the decree. >> gregg: give us a sense of the number
's in cairo and meeting with the egyptian president mohammed morsi who has emerged as a key player in the effort to try to end the fighting between israel and hamas. but mr. morsi walking a very tight political and social, for that matter, tight rope. reza sayah joining us from cairo. reza, morsi playing a pivot on the role, as egypt has in the past, in these talks. balancing the expectations of his street, the people that elected him and the muslim brotherhood, as well as the u.s. and the international community and all that is bound into that. >> yeah. michael, in many ways as we speak today egyptian president mohammed morsi is viewed as maybe the most important voice for the palestinians on the world stage, and to understand the type of pressure he is under it's so important to understand how arabs, how egyptians view this conflict between the palestinians and the israelis because it is very different from the western view. egyptians, arabs, look at the latest round of fighting, and they see more than 130 palestinians killed compared to five israelis killed. they should taking o
-fire between israel and hamas that took effect last night looks to be holding. the deal was announced in cairo and ended eight days of fighting the new islamic egyptian government played a key role in brokering the u.s. backed truce. secretary of state hillary clinton called this a critical moment for the region. following a 24 hour cooling off period talks will resume on key issues like the israeli blockade. susan mcginnis starts us off in washington this morning. good morning to you. happy thanksgiving. >> reporter: good morning. happy thanksgiving. this is a very tenuous cease-fire. deep mistrusts remain on both sides. it feels like both sides have their finger on the trigger. residents are gathering their belongings and heading home. many took refuge in a united nations shelter while israel and the militant group hamas spent eight days in a bloody conflict. under the cease-fire agreement hamas promises to stop firing rockets. israel says it will end air strikes and will ease border restrictions that have stifled gaza's economy for years. after a deal was reached the residents poured into t
had gathered in cairo's tahrir square calling for the ouster of president mohamed morsy. opposition leaders say new powers grabbed by morsy make him look like a dictator. reza sayah has more on the massive protests. >> reporter: outrage, clashes and anguish in tahrir. thousands of angry egyptians back in a public square that has become the arab world's emblem for the democratic right to protest. this was where egyptians demanded the ouster of former president hosni mubarak last year. this time the fury aimed at current president mohamed morsy. >> we're here because we don't want morsy to rule us anymore. >> a one-man show. he wants to do everything. nothing at all of what we want, you know? >> reporter: on thursday, the new president made himself the most powerful man in egypt by announcing sweeping decrees he says will designed to push forward the drafting of egypt's new constitution and speed up the formation of a government that's still missing a parliament. >> one of his decrees bans anyone from overturning any of his declarations since he took over office in june. that order is
between morsi's muslim brotherhood, and the opposition parties. police used terd gas in cairo yesterday. more than 500 have been injured and egypt's judicial branch is joining with the opposition in protest. both sides have announced plans for major protests in cairo on tuesday. cbs news correspondent holly williams is in cairo this morning. holly, what can you tell synonymous. >> reporter: well, bob, what we're seeing here today in central cairo is violent clashes. they're fighting running street battles in the area around tahrir square, so the protesters throw stones and sometimes hurl obcents at the police. they push their way down the street and after a while the police fire back with tear gas canisters or drive an armored car down the street, and the street is then cleared. the numbers are actually fairly small. i would say there are between 1,000 and 2,000 protesters, and only some of them are violent. as you said, both sides are planning big protests on tuesday, and given what we're seeing, i don't think it would be surprising if we see violent clash betweens the two sides. but y
in cairo's tahrir square. they plan to press ahead with the demonstration today, demanding that morsi relent on his seizure of near absolute authority. he said the edict was temporary and only granted him limited authority. holly williams is in cairo. do we have any indication of what the president there is going to do? is he going to back down? >> good morning. well, president mohamed morsi is clearly trying to persuade people that he doesn't want to be a dictator. he met with a group of senior egyptian judges and he told them that his new immunity of the courts would only apply to sovereign matters. the problem with that is we don't know exactly what it means and it certainly won't be enough to satisfy his opponents. in fact, one of those judges described it as a frail statement. for president morsi's critics, they are still extremely angry about the series of decrees that he issued on thursday that give him greatly expanded power. >> meanwhile, protests continue where you are in tahrir square. what are we going to see throughout day right about now when those protests really ramp u
is in cairo where she met with president mohamed morsi of egypt who's mediating the discussions. as secretary clinton carries the official white house message there is new attention being paid to the president's strategic options in the region. "the washington post" writes president obama's decision to send his top diplomat on an emergency middle east peace making mission tuesday marked an administration shift to a more active vist role in the region's affairs and offered clues to how he may use the political elbow room afforded by a second term. beyond a cease-fire agreement, the president could try to throw his political clout behind a larger, long-term solution here. so far, no deal has materialized between israel and gaza. also, a bus bombing in tel aviv could push both sides further apart. 19 people were injured, three critically, in what was the first terror attack in israel in four years. police say, however, the incident was not a suicide bombing. joining me now, former assistant secretary of state, p.j. crowley and from tel aviv, nbc news correspondent stephanie gosk. thank you, both
the start of bargaining time. power and protest. furious demonstrators take to tahrir square in cairo, as egypt's new president rewrites the rules. >> the crowds are rowdy, rough, and down right rude, and the holiday shopping season has only just begun. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm radi kaye. it's 8:00. from maine to florida, millions of people are heading home as the thanksgiving holiday is wrapping up. today is usually one of the busiest travel days of the year, but so far it has been surprisingly quiet. cnn national correspondent suzanne candiotti is in new york hanging out with a few travellers this morning. suzanne, good morning to you. so i guess it's still pretty early in the day, but it should probably get pretty busy there later on. >> oh, it probably will pick up, but the best news of the day at this hour, anyway, is that there are virtually no backups to check in and no lines at security. there was a little flurry of activity earlier this morning, but now it's practically dead. this is the best time to fly on this busy, busy holiday weekend. of course, it is expected to
are set to resume tomorrow in cairo. the egyptians have been mediating cease-fire talks following this month's deadly eight-day conflict over gaza. a hamas spokesman said topics will include opening border crossings and easing israel's economic blockade of gaza. >>> and in bangladesh, at least 117 people, most of them women, are dead and 200 others hurt after fire rips through a clothing factory. some 2,000 people were working inside the nine-story building when the blaze broke out. the casualty count is expected to rise. >>> the muslim brotherhood says one of its members, a 15-year-old boy, was killed today. and another 60 people injured in an attack on the group's headquarters in the egyptian town of damanaur. leaders say the boy was killed by thugs in the "the total absence of police forces." the violence is part of clashes that erupted across egypt last week after president mohamed morsi issued a sweeping decree that significantly expands his own powers. let's go to cairo now where reza is following the story. what do we know about this attack? >> reporter: obviously, we've se
pictures now. cairo, egypt, tahrir square. and thousands of people are refusing to go home. they are angry at their president. they say he's made himself a dictator. it's quiet now in cairo. it's just after 2:00 a.m., but it definitely was not quiet earlier in the day. listen. tear gas filled the air and crowds of protesters scattered when riot police tried to break up the protests in cairo. we have reports of demonstrators trying to break into the offices of the president's party, the muslim brotherhood. and at least one person reportedly died today in the street violence, a teenager. cnn's reza sayah spent much of the day right in the middle of the chaos in cairo. >> we keep seeing these clashes between protesters and police, protesters throwing rocks at police. police responding by firing tear gas and stun grenades. we're just a few blocks away from tahrir square. we should point out most of these protesters are young men, 20-something, teenagers, hard to say if they're here fighting for democracy or here to cause some trouble. those were chants of down with president mo
with palestinian authority leaders and going to cairo to meet with mohamed morsi. i wouldn't be surprised based on what i'm hearing if there is no deal yet, she might come back to jerusalem, engage in some shuttle diplomacy, akin to henry kissinger. if israel moves into gaza with massive amounts of grounds forces, tanks, heavy artillery, armored personnel carriers, it will be a disaster. you know this area, you're there. you know how densely populated it is. it's going to be a serious problem and what the u.s. and egyptians, most of the international community, they want make sure israelis don't do it. but prime minister benjamin netanyahu say to keep the rockets and missiles come there coming in, they might have to do it. >> the death toll now in gaza, palestinian officials say is 137 people killed so far in the seven, now eight days going into the conflict. official death toll for israel is five. one soldier was killed today, first soldier killed by a rocket fires from gaza. joined by arwa damon and been ben wedeman. the blasts bring home the difficulties so many civilians face. people don't
of 1940 the and journeys of grandeur to write in the streets of cairo to make a plea for cairo. they drove the i talions pretty far west into libya to bailout mazzoleni although they were not happy about that the famous tank commander along with a bunch of panthers and effectively drove the british back into egypt. now when the summer rolls around things quiet down and it's terribly hot and they would seize the two sides to begin, and then in the fall of 1941 there was again advanced by the british into libya in hopes of driving back the forces he turned around and pushed the british back again and all the way this time sort of disastrously all the way deep into egypt, deeper than they had ever been before. so, when the american soldiers arrived, the allies i should say and the axis forces were dug in and testing each other in a place which was about 60 miles west of alexandria close enough to alexandria which was the british naval center in egypt close enough to cairo to be really extremely dangerous and i think frightening to all the allies on the suez canal or the middle eastern oil fie
. >> this morning saw relative calm in cairo's tahrir square, but protesters insisted they will not latest site until president morsi withdraws the sweeping decree he issued last week. it gives him broad new powers, free from judicial review. >> ( translated ): we demand the president listens to the people who chose him, the people who elected him so he would defend the people. >> reporter: that could provoke more trouble after a weekend of violence hitting liberal and secular factions against morse's islamist supporters. last night in cairo, protesters threw rocks at police who fired back with tear gas. demonstrators also clashed with pro-morsi egyptians. attacks on the local offices of the muzz lum brotherhood left one teenager dead and dozens of people wounded. thousands of the president's backers staged rallies in several cities. >> we support mohamed morsi's correct decision and eventually the good from the bad will be distinguishable. we support dr. morsi. >> u.s. officials raised concerns about morsi's decree. today the state department's victoria newlyand called for calm. >> what is imp
. [ gunfire ] secretary of state hillary clinton and egypt's foreign minister announced the deal in cairo after the secretary spent the day in intense face-to-face talks with the leaders of israel, the palestinian authority and egypt. >> this is a critical moment for the region. egypt's new government is assuming the responsibility and leadership it has long made this country a cornerstone of regional stability and peace. >> we're still learning details of the agreement between the israelis and hamas. egypt and the united states apparently have assumed important major roles in keeping the peace and preventing new supplies of rockets from being smuggled into gaza. president obama spoke by phone today with the leaders of both egypt and israel. >> translator: i have agreed with the president that israel and the united states would work together to prevent the smuggling of arms to the terror organizations. the vast majority of which comes from iran. >> throughout this crisis cnn has positioned crews throughout the region including correspondents in egypt and on both sides of the israeli/gaza
into in cairo and had a very, very up front, real, and personal discussion about what it's like to be a young person in a predominantly muslim country. yeah, helen? >> did you see any tension between the ashkenazi and the sephardic populations? >> did not see it but heard about it. >> and between the secular and the religious views, did you see that? >> that, definitely. yeah, we definitely saw that. so let me get the ball rolling here, because these are actually well longer than our normal roll-ins, but i think it's appropriate when we have such an unusual setting. as we go through this, though, let's keep in mind our previous lessons from the previous class about ethics, patterns of action, how people try to conduct themselves, and see how there's these inevitable conflicts with- good comments we had in the last class about how yes, we're speaking about religion, but we're speaking about land and nationalism and politics, and just human frailty, you know, human complexity. so with no further adieu, let's go to our first roll-in on ethical conflicts in israel. >> the motivational heart of th
. the launch pad for peace may be in cairo. in the last 24 hours egypt has been mediating high-stakes discussions between israeli and hamas leaders. speaking today egyptian prime minister hish m kandil said -- in gaza, palestinian medical officials report 95 people have been killed in gaza including 23 children. for the second straight day, israel bombed a building housing local and international media. the target of the attack was a commanding member of an islamic jihad group who also had an apartment in the building. meanwhile, hamas continues to send rockets deep into israel. last night, israel's iron dome intercepted two rockets headed for tel aviv. yesterday, israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu had tough talks on twitter writing we are exacting a heavy price from hamas and the terrorist organizations. the idf is prepared for a significant expansion of its operation. in a press gaggle on route to cambodia this morning, deputy national security adviser ben rhodes says the white house's goal is to have nations with influence in the region speak for deescalation. speakin
for what could be another night of deadly attacks despite the diplomatic activity in cairo. negotiations are under way as well as palestinian factions as to what to do next, but those here in gaza say they are preparing for a ground invasion, and meaning if israel launches a war, they will fight and they are prepared to defend their territory as they say and on the same side israelis say they have finalized preparation for a ground invasion and now it is a matter of a political decision, and certainly something that everybody in cairo is trying to avert, but one that everybody here thinks it is not going to be averted any time soon. thomas? >> well, you talk about the diplomatic conversations in cairo, and what is on the table? what terms are being discussed? >> well, two central issues from the two perspectives. the head of the hamas today held a press conference in which he highlighted hamas position, and that is simple in their eyes, israel must stop all hostilities against the leadership and assassinating and killing key palestinian figures and call on the international community to
, then go to israel, to cairo, to meet with mohammed morsi. what are you hearing about what's come out of her talks with netanyahu? >> well, they met for about two hours, and it wasn't just with the prime minister, but the defense minister of israel, the foreign minister, the national security team. they spent two hours going over what's going on. the statement released by the state department says she was briefed on the israeli position on all these issues. she's making it clear she wants to see a deescalation of what's going on. she uses the word a calm. they are avoiding the word cease-fire for right now but throughout the day, as you know, there was speculation coming from hamas and egyptian officials that they were close to a cease-fire agreement. the israelis downplaying that possibility, saying they weren't there until they actually had an agreement. there's no agreement and if anything, it looks like there was an intensification of the shelling in southern israel today by hamas and an intensification of israeli attacks in gaza witnessed by what happened to you guys, what you sa
is good. my money. my choice. my meineke. >>> cairo to istanbul, anger erupting over the latest conflict involving israel and hamas. these pictures come to us from indonesia, more than 5,000 people march through the streets of jakarta sunday, protesting israeli air strikes. the crowd marched to the u.s. embassy carrying flag and posters condemning israel. let's turn to egypt and a narrow strip of land that borders gaza. the rafa border, that's the crossing, this is gaza's only gateway to an arab ally. let's turn from this map to what is happening on the ground. the rafah crossing has become a dangerous place to be. it is a major crossing point for protesters and for those who are trying to smuggle weapons and supplies into gaza. israel says it is bombing smuggling tunnels that run under rafah. the border crossing is clogged with anti-israel protesters, trying to gain access to gaza. reza sayah reports. >> reporter: this is where egypt's border meets gaza. gaza is a small piece of land, about twice the size of washington, d.c. it has four gateways, three of them are inside israel. they're
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